Interactive: See the Lands Sold to Fund Ohio’s Land “Grant” Universities

Native Americans Demand More Recognition From Universities They Funded, Sometimes Unwillingly

This story was funded by a grant from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. This article provided by Eye on Ohio, the nonprofit, nonpartisan Ohio Center for Journalism. Please join our free mailing list or text us at (216) 867-6327 as this helps us provide more public service reporting. Growing up in Cleveland, Eastern Band Cherokee tribal member Nicole Doran said Chief Wahoo always made her uncomfortable. 

“I remember growing up and seeing this caricature of Native Americans that I knew wasn’t true,” Doran said. 

Later she earned a biology degree at the Ohio State University. Doran loved the campus and appreciated the opportunities given to her, but she was not happy about the lack of Native American acknowledgement on campus.

Ohio Schools Start Thinking out of the Box to Stem School Shootings: Expanded Teacher Training Versus the 22 Safes With Loaded Guns

Licking Valley Schools Superintendent David Hile shuddered when he saw the Facebook image of the boy with a menacing stare and a gleaming assault rifle. It was the same boy who, after threatening students, had been expelled from school for 80 days, the maximum time allowed under state law. And now, two days before the boy’s anticipated return, Hile felt powerless to stop the boy he saw as a clear threat despite all the red flags. Last week’s school shooting in Parkland, Florida, left 17 dead and questions about how a killer was able to fly under the radar with such a long history of intimidation. There were numerous citizens who called in warnings about Nikolas Cruz, he had had run-ins with police over incidents when his anger exploded, he had intimidated, bullied and threatened students at the school.